Archive for the 'Scholarship Success Stories' Category

Hungerford Nichols Creating Synergy for Students and Alumni

When Heather Halligan, ’03, pictured the perfect job, she envisioned one that put people first.
Heather Halligan, who began working at Hungerford Nichols nearly five years ago as a Marketing Specialist, said that is why she loves her position. “Hungerford believes in helping people. We have a family-like culture where people enjoy going to work.”
Many of her colleagues, 13 to be exact, feel Davenport prepared them to be savvy-solution seekers to fit in the highly collaborative culture at Hungerford.
“Hungerford Nichols has uncovered a fruitful pipeline of resources in Davenport University students and alumni,” claimed Human Resources Specialist and current MBA student Hillary Mullennix ’18. “Davenport’s business-focused instruction fits our culture.”
Mullennix applied to Davenport because of her experience working with professors and staff. “Both the professors and career services staff are extremely invested in the success of the student. They are passionate about helping students find jobs and building their networks. I wanted to go to a place where people cared about the students.”
Davenport has become a path to recruit successful employees for all three Hungerford businesses spanning accounting, IT and financial services. Between the three divisions, nine alumni and students work for Hungerford Nichols CPAs + Advisors, three graduates work for Hungerford Technology and one finance instructor works at Hungerford Financial.
“Hungerford has an innovative strategy to recruit Davenport students,” exclaimed Mullennix. “We build relationships with students before they graduate. We meet with them over coffee, in a comfortable environment, and share all of Hungerford’s opportunities, including interning, job shadowing or completing office visits. Then we give them information about the types of accounting options including tax, corporate and auditing.”
Additionally, Mullennix noted that Davenport makes it easy to hire students by offering flexible course options. She said this aligns with Hungerford’s mission of work-life balance. “We allow our employees to set a schedule that works best to meet our client’s needs, allowing our employees to take classes when it is most convenient.” She said the relationship they’ve built with DU is mutually beneficial—it provides meaningful work to great employees.
(l to r) Spencer DeYoung ‘14 MIA, Network Administrator; Cris Sanchez ’13 BS, Network Administrator; Seth Winchester ’11 BAS, Network Administrator; Jenny VanderBoon ‘ 11 BBA, MBA, Manager; Jenn Rogell ’10 BBA, MBA, Manager; Diane Brownell ’88 BBA, Senior Accountant; Elizabeth Jacobsson, current student, Accountant; Jessica Giddings, current student, Accountant, Heather Halligan ’03 MBA, Marketing Specialist; Hillary Mullennix, current MBA student, Human Resource Specialist; not pictured: Sherrin Burnette, Administrative Professional; Matt Warner ‘14 BS, Network Engineer; Tom Price, Finance Instructor since 2010

Kuana Says Thank You…

Dear Davenport University Donors,

Hello, my name is Kuana Marie School. I am a senior nursing student at Davenport University at the Lansing campus. I want to begin by saying “thank you” for supporting scholarships at all of our Davenport locations. Because of you, I received a scholarship that not only helped to fund my nursing education, it actually ensured that I was able to remain in school to date. There was a point in time recently that being dropped was eminent (not for a lack of effort nor poor grades). Rather, what threatened my ability to remain a student was merely the inability to complete payment on the last 20% of my tuition. It was the MLK Essay contest scholarship award that came through for me. And, to my astonishment, I was awarded the exact amount I needed. You – the scholarship donors – are not some superficial extension of the college. You just may be the very core of it…a crucial aspect that allows us students to actualize our innate gifts. The end result being that we want to give back after we graduate. At least this is true for me.

As a child, I was fascinated by learning, regardless of a lack of resources and uninvolved parents. I was that child who would at times choose to skip recess in order to read the encyclopedia in a corner, or to help my teachers in the classroom. At home, I would look after my little brothers and spend time teaching them the skills I learned. Later, in my teen years, I enjoyed helping my grandmother (who suffers from a severe mental illness) and great-grandmother on a regular basis. I became fully aware that I was someone who received a deep sense of gratification from helping others. Giving back was cathartic and created a sense of purpose for me even then.

This interest in helping people led me to become a certified athletic trainer and nutritional coach for a fitness center in East Lansing, MI. I was able to encourage others towards living a better life, and I was also “practicing what I preached”, I was healthy and I felt great. Even though that career lasted over a decade – still there was this “itch” – a feeling that there was more in me to give. But, by this time I had become a mother, and had a family of my own to tend to, which became my priority.

Finally, after hearing time and time again from clients who served in the medical field that I would “make a great nurse”, I did it. I jumped in enthusiastically in pursuit of a nursing degree and began working as a certified nurse aide. Working in home care and hospice care was utterly fulfilling, and I loved every minute of it! With each pre-requisite class I took, came more confirmation that I was in the right place. Once accepted into the BSN program at Davenport University in Lansing, I began my role as a student nurse caring for patients in my clinical rotations.

Nursing school can be challenging. Especially while working nearly 30 hours a week to ensure the bills are paid and there is food on the table for my family. I had to take two years off from school from 2011 through 2013 to work and save money. When I returned, I learned a few of my classes I had earned a 4.0 grade in had expired at the junior college I had transferred from. I was tempted to give up then, but followed through. The financial aspect of making it through nursing school as a single (divorced) mother has been tough at times. But, this is my calling, and I have paced myself to make it this far, and I do not give up easily.

I have one year left to graduate with my Bachelor’s Degree in Nursing Science and am aspiring to graduate with honors. I will be the first in my family to graduate from college.

I am currently involved in scientific research at the Lansing campus. My interest in research since my early years has continued to expand, allowing me to hone in on what I am meant to pursue post-graduation. Since my junior year, I have volunteered in DU’s Bioinformatics Lab under the leadership of instructor, Laura Harris as a student researcher, author and presenter at microbiology conferences around the state. I have also actively participated in the student nurse association (SNA) on my campus, and served on the board during my junior year in the editor position. I am still an active participant with our Lansing SNA. These things I simply enjoy, and have learned much thus far.

Our Lansing Bioinformatics team seeks to better understand antibiotic resistant genes of bacteria, in effort to assist in creating more efficient pharmaceutical therapies to promote better patient outcomes. Our team was the first ever to be published in an internationally recognized scientific publication such as Bioinformation from Davenport University. This supplement to my nursing program has grown a desire within me serve in community health, such as infectious disease, clinical trials nursing or integrative health.

I have never lost that desire to help others, and I will give back. Because of people like you with this same desire, I am able to continue “paying it forward”. I wholeheartedly thank you for your support of Davenport University. Without you, I would not have been able to finish nursing school and pursue my lifelong dream of helping others in this process we all experience: life!

Many thanks,

Kuana M. School

DU Review Sneak Peek: Bonnie ’84, ’94 and Ron ’88 Kopp and Melanie (Kopp) Reilly ’13

For more than 25 years, Bonnie Kopp ’84, ’94 has worked to create legacies for others through her work as senior trust advisor at Northern Trust. Bonnie works with families to help build wealth, create estate plans and manage funds for those who have created trusts. About her philosophy, she says, “It isn’t the number of years you spend on earth that matters; it is the legacy you leave behind for those that follow you.”

Bonnie is also part of a proud a legacy family at Davenport University. Both she and her husband of 32 years, Ron Kopp ‘88, attended Davenport after high school. “I worked full-time at a bank during the day and went to school at night, while Ron worked in the factory at Steelcase at night and went to school during the day. Our companies had tuition reimbursement so it was only natural for us to pursue our degrees.”

Bonnie graduated with an associate degree in 1984 and bachelor’s degree in 1994 while Ron graduated with his associate degree in 1988. Davenport continued to be a part of their life as their careers flourished and they started a family.

Nearly 30 years later, Bonnie’s oldest daughter, Melanie (Kopp) Reilly ‘13 needed a school that offered a flexible online program to earn an MBA while she worked in New Zealand. Bonnie recommended Davenport. DU’s online program was exactly what she was looking for. “Studying online at Davenport worked really well for me because of the flexibility offered,” said Melanie. “It didn’t matter that I was in a different time zone. The instructors were supportive and genuinely interested in my experience overseas; they were happy to help cater my homework and essays towards how it would apply to New Zealand. I enjoyed interacting with students all over the U.S.”

Now, as an alumni board member, Bonnie shares her passion with fellow alumni who want to give back to the University. “As an alumna and now parent of a student, I have a more well-rounded understanding of what Davenport has to offer. I hope that our story motivates others to share their experiences and passion for Davenport.”

Did you know?

Davenport’s academic programs available through the online Global Campus are receiving accolades from various organizations based upon a variety of criteria, including cost, value, accreditation, experiential training and curriculum. “We are excited about the growing recognition for Davenport’s high quality academic programs available through its online Global Campus,” said Brian Miller, Dean for Davenport’s Global Campus. “Online learning allows many students to better manage their time while pursuing their higher education degree while also working. The Global Campus brings more than 50 high-quality programs to students wherever they may live.”

DU Review Sneak Peek: Sue Nemmers ’85 and Rachel Payne ’10, ’12

For Susan (Kitzrow) Nemmers ‘85, Davenport University is a special place for two generations of her family. “Both my daughter, Rachel, and I started at Davenport in pursuit of a business education but gained so much more. Though we attended 25 years apart, we gained very similar experiences, friendships and a foundation for our success. It is our home.”

Sue started at Davenport after high school to pursue her associate degree in the executive secretarial program, with the help of grants and scholarships. She worked on campus as a work-study student to help in the alumni and development office. After graduation, she accepted a full-time role as the first alumni director of Davenport College. She admits, “It was amazing that Davenport took a risk, hiring me as a 20 year old.” Sue was responsible for growing the alumni association, running the phonathon program, hosting alumni events, creating marketing materials and managing the alumni board.

“It was the best job,” Sue recalled. “It was truly a grassroots effort and the University supported me one hundred percent. We had an alumni holiday party in my parent’s basement.”

Sue worked in the alumni office at Davenport for five years and was concurrently a member of the first class at Davenport to earn a Bachelor of Business Administration degree in 1985.

Sue married Dave Nemmers in 1984 and settled in Caledonia. Four years later, they welcomed their first child, Rachel.

Almost 18 years later, Rachel (Nemmers) Payne’s ’10, MBA ’12 journey at Davenport mirrors her mother’s. Rachel started at Davenport in the fall of 2006 after receiving the W.A. Lettinga Full-Tuition Charter Scholarship. “At first, I was interested in becoming a collegiate cheerleader and I knew Davenport didn’t have a program yet. I knew my mom had a great experience at DU and realized how impactful the full-ride scholarship was to my future. I couldn’t pass it up.”

Almost immediately, Rachel became an advocate for a new DU cheer program. As a sophomore, she created proposals, wrote plans and met with the Athletic Director, Paul Lowden, about starting a cheer program. Rachel recalled, “Looking back, I can’t believe I was that persistent!”

Her persistence paid off in February of her senior year when the head cheerleading coach position was posted. She interviewed and earned the head coaching role in early spring. During this time, Rachel was a work-study student in the Human Resources department working in training and development.

“It was perfect. After I graduated with my BBA in 2010, the HR department hired me as a student worker. I was able to earn my MBA as a full-time student, hone my HR skills as a part-time intern and grow the program from the ground up as the cheer coach.”

Rachel spent much of her time promoting the program and recruiting cheerleaders, taking time to be selective and build the legacy of the program effectively. Rachel enlisted her mother to help her with the program too. “Mama Sue” traveled with the cheerleading team as they competed regionally and nationally.

During Rachel’s six-year tenure as the cheerleading coach, she led the program to three national championships. “The best part about my time coaching at Davenport was seeing all of the athletes continue their passion for the sport of cheerleading at a school that was extremely supportive of the program.  Davenport took a chance on me when they hired me to start the program from the ground up.  I am so proud to see the legacy and success of the program continue on with some of the most talented coaches and athletes in the country.”

Today, Rachel is a human resources professional at Spectrum Health and Sue is an active community volunteer. Both serve DU in mentoring roles as well as staying active with the Alumni Association by attending events and activitiesBecause Davenport was such an integral part of Sue’s formative years, she and her husband, Dave, decided to leave a portion of their estate to Davenport in their estate plans.

“It is amazing how alike Rachel and I are,” Sue said. “Our relationship has grown stronger because of our ability to relate and reminisce about our similar paths at Davenport.”

Following Grandpa’s Footsteps – Roger Luurtsema & Allison Luurtsema #TBT Story

“I chose Davenport because I wanted instruction that was practical and directly applicable to my career,” Roger Luurtsema explained.  Now, nearly 65 years later, his granddaughter Allison Luurtsema is following in his footsteps; eager to learn and grow at Davenport.

Roger was born to Peter and Lillian Luurtsema in their Grand Rapids home in 1932 and graduated from Ottawa Hills High School. He knew he wanted to go into sales because he had uncles he admired who were salesmen and because he had “the gift of gab” and a sense of humor.

He enrolled at Davenport after high school in 1950 and still recalls that many of his instructors left a lasting impression.  Like instructor Andy Anderson, who tricked a shy boy into overcoming his fear of public speaking in the Dale Carnegie class or the commercial law instructor who was a lawyer and also an artist and illustrated principles of law with cartoon style drawings.

“Our class was very close and had a lot of comradery. We were on the second floor of the Fulton and N. Division street building. The first floor had retail stores and a restaurant where we often socialized over coffee and donuts,” Luurtsema reflected.

He appreciated that his classes were always led by people who were successful in their professional fields.  Roger remembered Robert Sneden as a good teacher who was professional, sophisticated and businesslike and added that, “we were all in awe of Mr. Davenport.”

“I am happy with my choice of attending Davenport,” said Roger. “Throughout my forty-five year career in sales, the fundamental principals were the thing that carried me through and that show the quality of the training.”

Roger earned his diploma for completing his salesmanship course from the Davenport-McLachlan Institute in 1951. He married five years after graduating from college and moved to Ann Arbor, MI to start his long, successful career.

Roger worked at a few different companies before settling in at EcoLab where he spent more than 33 years as a salesperson with a territory spanning from Lansing to Detroit. He also found success in translating his education and experience into training other salespeople.

During this time period, Roger and his wife, Wilma, started a family. They have five children, fifteen grandchildren, seventeen great grandchildren and more on the way.

One of his granddaughters, Allison Luurtsema, started at DU in the fall of 2016. Allison grew up playing soccer with her father, Phil, who also spent many hours on the soccer field as a kid. “She has won all the awards you can win, including the top female athlete of her high school,” said her proud grandfather.

When it came time to look for colleges, Allison knew she wanted to play soccer and pursue nursing. One of her coaches recommended Davenport. As her family researched options, Roger showed her a promotional piece with his photo on it from his days at Davenport.

Roger’s experience sparked Allison’s interested in Davenport. “I think it is a great connection to have with my grandpa. Similar to my connection with my dad and soccer, I am able to follow in my grandpa’s footsteps at Davenport, building a family legacy.”

Allison’s first year as a Davenport University nursing student at the W.A. Lettinga Campus is off to a great start. Soon, she will have stories of her own about teachers, student life and classwork to share with her family.

Do you have a Davenport legacy story? Davenport University legacy families are families who have a multi-generational connection to the University. The University identifies legacy students as those who have had a family member or members graduate from DU. Submit your legacy story to alumni@davenport.edu!

 

Alumni Success Story – Mohamad Abdulkader Agha ‘03

Chancellor Emeritus Donald W. Maine called it fate. Mohamad Abdulkader Agha ‘03 called it meant to be. Their serendipitous relationship is heartwarming. Learn more about Mohamad’s path to Davenport and his success as he lives and works in Dubai, leading the strategy team at the International Humanitarian City (IHC), part of the Mohammad Bin Rashid Global Initiatives foundation to improve 130 Million lives by 2025 through humanitarian and developmental work. Read more below.

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Nearly 6,000 miles from his home in Syria, Agha found a new place to call home in Grand Rapids in early 2001. His decision to come to America wasn’t easy. After losing his father at the age of 13 and his mother only nine years later, Agha found himself looking for guidance in his next step. Luckily, he has three older sisters who had his best interests in mind and encouraged him to gain a global perspective on life by pursuing his MBA in the United States.

His brother-in-law, who is a doctor in the Grand Rapids area, recommended that he check out Davenport because he heard that the class sizes were small and the professors used real-life experiences to teach the classes.

Agha recalled wondering why he should go to a school in a small city, when he could go to school in Los Angeles or New York City.  His brother-in-law’s advice was to go a place where he could have personal attention. Agha remembered his brother-in-law saying, “Don’t be a small fish in a big pond, be a big fish in a small pond.”

Agha started classes at Davenport in spring 2001 and in the summer he completed a graduate program at Georgetown University, then went back home to be with family. While he was home, the events that shook the world on September 11th occurred. Things were uncertain and he was unsure if he was going to return to Davenport.

“I got a phone call from Davenport,” said Agha. “The call was from my advisor.  She said, ‘Congrats, Mohamad! You have been awarded the international students’ scholarship this year. We look forward to your coming back to Davenport.’ And that call made me book my flight to come back.”

As his studies progressed, he continued to build relationships on campus. He got an invitation to speak at the international students’ luncheon because of his reputation for academic success and charismatic professionalism.

“I got up, I did my speech and after I was done, I was asked to join a table with the former president of Davenport University, Don Maine. I shook hands with him and we introduced ourselves to each other. I was sitting there, enjoying being next to the “big man on campus,” yet not really knowing who he was. Then, the former VP of Alumni & Development walked up and said, “Mohamad, that gentleman paid for your scholarship. Your scholarship is the Maine Family International Student Scholarship!”

From that moment, Agha and Maine clicked. Although there was a difference in age and experience, they became friends.

Maine recalled, “When I realized international students did not receive financial aid, I wanted to direct my donation to those international students who needed it, kids like Mohamad. It is the humanitarianism in me. I enjoy helping young global talents.”

As Agha’s career flourished, so did their friendship. “We used to have lunches that lasted two to three hours to discuss global affairs at a restaurant in East Grand Rapids. At that point in my life, I didn’t have a father. So guidance was either spontaneous, by observing others, or by Don giving me the time and mentoring me step by step.”

Agha consulted and updated Maine about every chapter of his life. After earning his MBA from Davenport, Agha worked at Ernst & Young. Next he was recruited by the United Nations. At the age of 30, he was the youngest director hired at the UN to manage the Private Sector Development Program. He led the UN Global Compact as a representative and secretary general to its Advisory Council for five years.

In 2012, Agha left the Middle East. He took a job at the World Logistics Council as the director of strategic partnerships to lead a global team which coordinated with organizations from 56 countries involving the top technology, finance, insurance and semi-government organizations.

Now, Agha and his wife, Rim, and baby twins (Abdulkader & Ayla), live and work in Dubai. He leads the strategy team at the International Humanitarian City (IHC), part of the Mohammad Bin Rashid Global Initiatives foundation to improve 130 Million lives by 2025 through humanitarian and developmental work.

“Here is a person whose country has collapsed,” said Maine. “He built a brand new global career. There are a lot of people who could not do that. He now has mastered the culture of the UAE and risen to the point of being entrusted to serve its global initiatives. He left Damascus to work in Geneva and Kuala Lumpur and then made his way back to the Middle East.”

What makes Agha’s relationship with Davenport so special is the personal attention he was given by Maine and the professors. He left Davenport with high academic knowledge and the culminating experience of all of the individuals who shared their experiences and knowledge with him.

“I am thankful for Don Maine because he filled a void in my life. Yes, his scholarship has made a huge difference in my life, but money could be replaced. What isn’t replaceable is his experience and later on his friendship and love that keeps growing. Thank you, Don Maine!”

Alumni Success Story – Megan Collison ‘12

As a Family Medicine Physician Assistant at Metro Health Hospital, alumna Megan Collison ’12 is devoted to providing comprehensive care for people of all ages. “I care for patients who need anything from a basic check-up to taking out stitches to treatment of chronic health conditions.” Learn more about Megan and why she enjoys being in family medicine below.

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Tell us about yourself, Megan!

I was born and raised in Grand Rapids. I attended West Catholic and was involved in athletics – volleyball, basketball, golf and track. I knew I wanted to play basketball in college, and Davenport was the perfect fit. I graduated with my medical case management degree in 2012 and a year later, got into the competitive Physician Assistant program at GVSU on my first try. Now, I am a Family Medicine Physician Assistant at Metro Health Hospital.

Tell us about your experience at Davenport.

When I found out I received a full-ride academic scholarship and had the chance to play basketball at DU, I could not turn down the opportunity. I loved every minute of my time at Davenport and made some lifelong friends. I was involved as a Panther Pack Leader, student-athlete and student employee in the call center. I enrolled in the medical case management program because healthcare has always been a passion of mine. I knew I wanted to be a PA, so the medical case management program covered  most of the prerequisite classes for my next step in the masters program. I took nursing classes too, which I think helped me be successful in PA school.

In a nutshell, what do you do?

As a Family Medicine Physician Assistant, our team’s goal is to provide comprehensive care for people of all ages. The practice that I work with has one supervising physician and two other PAs. We work together, yet very independently. We have about 6,500 patients in our practice and I usually see about 20-25 patients a day. Patients visit our office for many reasons ranging from the care of a new baby, routine check-ups, post hospital visits, or treatment of ongoing disease like diabetes.

How did you decide on family medicine?

I decided a few months before I graduated that I wanted to go into family practice. My original plan was to go into orthopedic surgery. After I had a few practicums, I realized family medicine was my passion. I enjoy building relationships with families. I’m able to treat everyone from babies and their mothers to their grandpas & grandmas. One of the joys of my job is telling someone they are pregnant, caring for them throughout their pregnancy, and then caring for the baby once he or she is born and watch them grow up. It becomes very family-oriented.

What is your dream job?

This is my dream job! I love my job because every day is different, which keeps me on my toes! Also, the people I work with are great! It is a rewarding career.

What advice to do you have for students?

As long as you work hard and are motivated to do well, there are always opportunities for you regardless of what type of degree you have. Don’t settle. Don’t stop until you are where you want to be in life. It may be difficult, but it will be worth it.

What do you do when you are not working?

My boyfriend and I love to golf and ride bikes. I have a basset hound, Bentley, who is the best. I also enjoy golfing with my mom and my grandma, who is 85.

W.A. Lettinga Charter Scholarship Club Alumni Reunion

Alumni who received the full tuition W.A. Lettinga Charter Scholarship in 2006 gathered on Monday, October 10 to thank Mr. Wilbur Lettinga ’55 for his generous contribution.

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Pictured L to R: Back Row: Jeremy Venlet, Nick Venlet, Katie Bravata, Megan Stiffler, Nick Kuncaitis, Rachel Payne, Beth Kosc, Vinny Baldiga, Sara Mooney; Second Row: Amy DeKievit, Devin Pierson, Samantha Mol, Emily Przekadzinski, Lisa Boeve; First Row: Bill Lettinga and Wilbur Lettinga

Q&A With Our Donors – Jerry and Suzanne Callahan

Jerry and Suzanne Callahan’s relationship with Davenport University spans more than two decades, which is fitting for people who describe themselves as lifelong learners. Their strong commitment to education and connection to Davenport led them to establish the Jerry and Suzanne Callahan Endowed Scholarship. Suzanne is a Davenport faculty member, teaching at the W.A. Lettinga Campus and online within the Marketing department. Jerry, now the Vice President of Innovations & Collaborations at the Van Andel Institute, served in a leadership role for Davenport’s Information Technology team from 1995-2000 and was instrumental in launching Davenport Online in 1997. They shared some of their thoughts on scholarship opportunities and the type of education DU provides with us.

You established an endowed scholarship at DU which you still support. What was your primary incentive to fund a scholarship?

Jerry: Simply put, we are lifelong learners. Our parents, and hopefully our children, see the true value of education as a life changing force. While our endowment is not the largest, we take great pride that someone is able to build part of their learning legacy as a result of our gift. We only hope it inspires the recipients to become lifelong learners, because that is where the fun is.

Suzanne: We realized that our [own] education was our ticket to opportunity and we wanted to do something to try to ease the burden for future students. Many of the students we knew at the time were full time working parents who might not have continued their degree if they did not have financial assistance. Other students we met were first-generation college attendees who may not have seen firsthand the way the college experience could open doors for their future and might not continue if finances got tight. The work ethic and desire to do more for themselves and their families motivated us to do our part to support their goals.

Jerry – you have been very involved in the West Michigan business sector for many years, including many entrepreneurial roles. Do you see Davenport as a launching pad for similar career paths? How does the education and experience DU provides prepare students to succeed in today’s world?

In a word, innovation. Every economy needs well-informed, practical problem solvers. This has always been, to me, the precise type of applied learning Davenport University has offered for more than 150 years.

What do you both feel most passionate about in your community?

Suzanne: I am privileged to serve on the Forest Hills Public Schools Board of Education and am completely immersed in innovation in K-12 education and how it relates to college and career. Now more than ever, I see a strong desire from the workforce, colleges and K-12 education to ensure students are engaged in deep and meaningful learning that will lead to success for them, their families and the community around them. In a related vein, we are active ambassadors for the Mary Free Bed YMCA. The Y is a powerful force for good in every corner of our community and we are particularly proud to be part of new facility. Teaching and learning about healthy lifestyles helps kids and families do well in school and work so this is a logical place to invest our energy.